Tourism and Land Grabbing in Bali

Ruben Rosenberg

(He/Him)

Researcher

The Hague University of Applied Sciences

Overview

The research provides a deeper look into the impact of tourism on agricultural systems, food security, food sovereignty and rural development in Bali. Finding reveal that the massive investment in the tourist industry has come at the expense of agricultural livelihoods.

To investigate the impacts of tourism development on traditional as well as non-traditional farming practices in Bali, Indonesia, particularly from the contextual lens of land grabbing and water grabbing.

Key Findings

Many farmers who sold land had less positive experiences – e.g. fewer economic activities available in order to sustain themselves over a long period.

    How to apply research

    Currently designated agricultural land receive a similar level of protection and designation as national forests – the zoning permissions associated with agricultural land are far too easy to either circumvent or change legitimately or illegitimately.
    Currently designated agricultural land receive a similar level of protection and designation as national forests – the zoning permissions associated with agricultural land are far too easy to either circumvent or change legitimately or illegitimately.
    Currently designated agricultural land receive a similar level of protection and designation as national forests – the zoning permissions associated with agricultural land are far too easy to either circumvent or change legitimately or illegitimately.
    Currently designated agricultural land receive a similar level of protection and designation as national forests – the zoning permissions associated with agricultural land are far too easy to either circumvent or change legitimately or illegitimately.
    Currently designated agricultural land receive a similar level of protection and designation as national forests – the zoning permissions associated with agricultural land are far too easy to either circumvent or change legitimately or illegitimately.
    Currently designated agricultural land receive a similar level of protection and designation as national forests – the zoning permissions associated with agricultural land are far too easy to either circumvent or change legitimately or illegitimately.

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      About this research

      The Transnational Institute (TNI)
      This research was funded by an external organisation, but detail has not been provided.

      Recommended for

      UN Sustainable Development Goals

      This research contributes to the following SDGs

      About this research

      The Transnational Institute (TNI)
      This research was funded by an external organisation, but detail has not been provided.

      Recommended for

      What findings means

      Research interviews with farmers and agricultural communities revealed concerns related to the impact of tourism on:
      i) local land tenure systems and traditional farming practices;
      ii) management of water resources and adaptation to climate change;
      iii) protection of native seed varieties and cultural heritage.

      The main findings were that although some of the farmers (depending on their geographical locations) had more positive relationships with the tourism industry (which depended on protective measures they had in place that prevented their land from being sold for tourism development), many farmers who sold land had less positive experiences – e.g. fewer economic activities available in order to sustain themselves over a long period. Ultimately, the development of the tourism infrastructure was in direct competition with, and therefore directly detrimental to the needs of the rural, agrarian communities.

      Methodology

      The snowball sampling technique was deployed to gather participants.

      Fieldwork was intensively conducted on-site over the course of one month and included semi- structured in-depth interviews, unstructured interviews, group sessions, and participant observation. These were primarily conducted on three agricultural “landscapes”. The geographic location of these landscapes was chosen in order to provide an accurate representation of the various farming practices (and attitudes towards tourism development) around the island, and to attempt to determine an association based on their proximity to tourism- related activities.

      Glossary

      Land Grabbing
      The process whereby large investors (public or private) acquire – through coercion or persuasion, legal or illegal means – large areas of land as well as concessions related to its use.

      Want to read the full paper? It is available open access

      Colorni, R. R. (2018). Tourism and land grabbing in Bali. Transnational Institute.

      Thank you to

      for helping to prepare this research